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"The Bush administration has closed the doors on endangered species"


The Center for Biological Diversity released a strongly worded press release today, a day which they say marks one year since the Bush administration last granted any species protection under the Endangered Species Act:

Today marks exactly one year since the U.S. Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service last protected any new U.S. species under the Endangered Species Act. Fittingly, on this same day, the House Natural Resources Committee is holding important oversight hearings on implementation of the Endangered Species Act by a recalcitrant Bush administration. The last time the agency went an entire year without protecting a single species was in 1981, when the infamous James Watt was Secretary of Interior. There are currently 279 highly imperiled species that are designated as candidates for listing as threatened or endangered and that face potential extinction.
 
"The Bush administration has closed the doors on endangered species," said Noah Greenwald, conservation biologist with the Center for Biological Diversity. "With the pressing threats of rapid habitat destruction and global climate change, it's an outrage that not a single new species has been protected by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for an entire year."
 
The last species protected by the administration were 12 Hawaiian picture-wing flies listed in a single rule on May 9, 2006. Overall, according to a report released today by the Center for Biological Diversity, the Bush administration has listed fewer species under the Endangered Species Act than any other administration since the law was enacted in 1973, to date only listing 57 species compared to 512 under the Clinton administration and 234 under the first Bush administration.

 

Read the rest of the release here: Bush Administration Sets All-time Record for Denying Protection to Endangered Species: Zero New Listings in Past Year